Skip to content

Tutorial Step1

vtk-examples/Python/Tutorial/Tutorial_Step1


Description

This example creates a polygonal model of a cone, and then renders it to the screen. It will rotate the cone 360 degrees and then exit. The basic setup of source -> mapper -> actor -> renderer -> renderwindow is typical of most VTK programs.

Other languages

See (Cxx)

Question

If you have a question about this example, please use the VTK Discourse Forum

Code

Tutorial_Step1.py

#!/usr/bin/env python

"""
=========================================================================

  Copyright (c) Ken Martin, Will Schroeder, Bill Lorensen
  All rights reserved.
  See Copyright.txt or http://www.kitware.com/Copyright.htm for details.

     This software is distributed WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even
     the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
     PURPOSE.  See the above copyright notice for more information.

=========================================================================*/

"""

# First access the VTK module (and any other needed modules) by importing them.
import vtk


def main(argv):
    #
    # Next we create an instance of vtkNamedColors and we will use
    # this to select colors for the object and background.
    #
    colors = vtk.vtkNamedColors()

    #
    # Now we create an instance of vtkConeSource and set some of its
    # properties. The instance of vtkConeSource "cone" is part of a
    # visualization pipeline (it is a source process object) it produces data
    # (output type is vtkPolyData) which other filters may process.
    #
    cone = vtk.vtkConeSource()
    cone.SetHeight(3.0)
    cone.SetRadius(1.0)
    cone.SetResolution(10)

    #
    # In this example we terminate the pipeline with a mapper process object.
    # (Intermediate filters such as vtkShrinkPolyData could be inserted in
    # between the source and the mapper.)  We create an instance of
    # vtkPolyDataMapper to map the polygonal data into graphics primitives. We
    # connect the output of the cone source to the input of this mapper.
    #
    coneMapper = vtk.vtkPolyDataMapper()
    coneMapper.SetInputConnection(cone.GetOutputPort())

    #
    # Create an actor to represent the cone. The actor orchestrates rendering
    # of the mapper's graphics primitives. An actor also refers to properties
    # via a vtkProperty instance, and includes an internal transformation
    # matrix. We set this actor's mapper to be coneMapper which we created
    # above.
    #
    coneActor = vtk.vtkActor()
    coneActor.SetMapper(coneMapper)
    coneActor.GetProperty().SetColor(colors.GetColor3d('MistyRose'))

    #
    # Create the Renderer and assign actors to it. A renderer is like a
    # viewport. It is part or all of a window on the screen and it is
    # responsible for drawing the actors it has.  We also set the background
    # color here.
    #
    ren1 = vtk.vtkRenderer()
    ren1.AddActor(coneActor)
    ren1.SetBackground(colors.GetColor3d('MidnightBlue'))

    # Finally we create the render window which will show up on the screen.
    # We put our renderer into the render window using AddRenderer. We also
    # set the size to be 300 pixels by 300.
    #
    renWin = vtk.vtkRenderWindow()
    renWin.AddRenderer(ren1)
    renWin.SetSize(300, 300)
    renWin.SetWindowName('Tutorial_Step1')

    #
    # Now we loop over 360 degrees and render the cone each time.
    #
    for i in range(0, 360):
        # Render the image
        renWin.Render()
        # Rotate the active camera by one degree.
        ren1.GetActiveCamera().Azimuth(1)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    import sys

    main(sys.argv)